Posts by David Dumas

Do Republicans Really Hate Gay People?

Recently, an article by author Chad Felix Green appeared in The Federalist. The article, titled The Stigma Against My Conservative Politics Is Worse Than The Stigma Of Being Gay is a point of view editorial by the author on his life, politics, and the backlash he’s faced since “coming out” as a conservative. 

The response wasn’t great.

Like this from the Chairman of the Democratic Coalition

Or this from a Deadspin columnist. 

Or this:

The list goes on. Rest assured, there was more random hate and outrage spewed at Chad from the left-wing community. The above examples are just a sampling of the response from the media and blue checkmark brigade.

Full Disclosure: I’m not gay. But Chad is. A fact that is obvious since he wrote the piece but also because he doesn’t hide many details of his life. As he outlined in his response to Jon Cooper’s tweet:

Why The Outrage?

It would be easy to pass this off as more leftist hate and double-standards. Does the ideologically-driven “left” of this country really hate people who “wander off the plantation” as commentator and provocateur Candace Owens often puts it?

Sure. There is a growing and religion-level orthodoxy to far leftist thinking. It is seeping into mainstream culture and being propagated by the corporate media.

When Kanye West dared say something nice about Trump, Hollywood acted as though he had a brain tumor. Literally.

When Steve Harvey declared he would be open to working with Trump to bring about positive change in the black community, the backlash essentially sent him back into the woodwork. 

When actor/writer/director Mark Duplass tacitly endorsed Ben Shapiro by saying, essentially, “hey, if you want to hear an honest voice from the other side, check this guy out” the outrage came for him as well. He was forced to retract.

Because feminist and sex educator Laci Green has *dared* converse with Conservatives and Republicans over the last few years; often debating them and taking a pretty typical “leftist” stance on most issues: she’s a travelling companion of the alt-right now, according to Vox.

The list goes on. The backlash against these individuals, as well as Chad Felix Green, shows the evangelical-level ferocity with which “the left” fights back against those who are led astray from the party line of the inter-sectional flock.

But of course, these views didn’t appear out of nowhere. Republicans and Conservatives have not historically been great on gay rights. However, the question is: where are they now? 

Do Republicans Hate Gay People?

I am not now, nor have I ever been a registered Republican. However, I am far more “on the right” than “the left” so sure, I’ll stand-in for Republican thought here.

Do Republicans hate gay people? Some of them do, sure. The same as some Democrats do. Some Libertarians do as well. Green Party? I’m sure there’s homophobia in there as well. Traditionally, since Republicans were closely associated with certain religious groups, this has been magnified. 

Those attitudes, however, are changing. As recently as 2001, a majority of Americans did not support same-sex marriage. That position has been changing rapidly since then.

Among religious-minded folks, attitudes have continued to change as well. Now, a majority of both Catholics and mainline Protestants support same-sex marriage. 

When viewed through a partisan lens, Republicans have also been coming around.

In fact, a greater percentage of self-identified “Conservatives” (41%) are likely to support same-sex marriage than self-identified Republicans (40%).

We’re Moving In the Right Direction

I realize those numbers aren’t where “the left” want them to be. They aren’t where we, as a society, should want to be either. But to put it simply, things don’t change overnight. Attitudes and opinions don’t change because of a law or an outrage mob. Nor should we expect them to. Nor should we attempt to force them to, lest we’re okay with creating a backlash.

In just a little over a decade, attitudes towards same-sex marriage have more than completely reversed. From 54% opposing in 2007 to 62% supporting in 2017. 

Perception, prejudice, bias, and hate do not disappear overnight. However, this is about as close to that occurring as you’re likely to see as an example.

No, I don’t think Republicans don’t by and large “hate” gay people. At least not the ones I’m familiar with and associate with. I’ve honestly not seen a real example of hatred directed towards homosexuality by anyone in my personal circle, past or present.

Is it true that some individuals may not approve of the lifestyle? Yes. And remember, according to the chart above, nearly 1/3 of Democrats would fall into that category as well. 

And that has more to do with the fact that it takes time to bring about change. 

My Own Story

If you had asked me 10 years ago if I supported gay marriage, my response would likely have been lukewarm at best. Maybe? Maybe not. If there was a a vote on it… I’m not sure I would have voted for it. Honestly? I don’t know.

I didn’t harbor any ill will towards the gay community, mind you. And I didn’t think being gay was bad, wrong, or sinful. Truth be told, I don’t think I had a strong opinion on it. I honestly don’t know. I don’t know why most of America didn’t support gay marriage back then either. We, as a society, just didn’t.

My views on this, and many other things, have changed. And they didn’t change because an angry mob yelled at me for being homophobic. They didn’t change because a law was passed to punish me if I said “hey, I’m not sure about gay marriage.” My views didn’t change because gay marriage was upheld by the Supreme Court. No. None of these moved the needle.

They changed for the same reason that anyone else changes their mind. Time and experience. 

When It Happens Close To Home

For a time I worked in a profession where homosexuals are, let’s say, well represented. I came to enjoy working with these individuals and considered a few of them friends. 

Yes, I had (and have) gay friends. Some of them became close friends. The same as any other friendship.

For me, the primary change to my way of thinking came from a particular experience I had. Several years ago and through my work I had become friendly with a lesbian couple. I had known them for several years at this point. Our relationship was a typical employee/customer relationship but it was friendly and in many ways personal.

One of the women became sick. Very sick. She required a major surgery to get better. Her partner, a woman with whom she’d been in a committed relationship with for upwards of 20 years, was not allowed any type of spousal or partner privilege. This would have been around 2007ish. Gay marriage wasn’t legal yet at this time.

In the eyes of the medical community (and more specifically, the laws governing it), she was basically a concerned friend. And friends don’t get granted special permissions, privileges, or access.

These two women were every bit as connected and committed to one another as any heterosexual couple. Yet, the doctors wouldn’t (couldn’t) discuss treatment options, test results, prognosis, etc. Nothing. Family members only. And you’re not family.

I didn’t agree with that. It seemed wrong. It was.

That Did It.

And so my mind changed. It had already been changing before then, but this was the final experience which caused me to re-examine my stance and change my mind. And it changed because that’s how mind’s change. Through time and experience. Through exposure to different people, cultures, and situations.

It wasn’t because a law was passed. And it wasn’t because an angry mob shamed me into getting on board. It was because the reality of the situation had hit close enough to home that I was able to have a serious conversation with myself and decide. 

I realize we live in a woke culture where everyone is supposed to take an obvious stance on issues like this. Younger folks may not realize that there was a time not too long ago where we, as a society, didn’t “just know” the correct stance to take.

So What Now?

I’m sure some Republicans do hate gay people. And I’m sure some Democrats do as well. Which is all the more reason, in my opinion, to treat people like individuals and judge them on their actions and words rather than whatever immutable characteristic box we can put them in.

It’s also all the more reason to not ascribe a presumed viewpoint or policy position to someone based solely on the letter (R) or (D) next to their name. People are a diverse group. Our opinions are often complicated. Sometimes they conflict with one another. Sometimes they go against stereotypical expectations.

If you believe in ideas rather than assumptions; in principles rather than people, you’ll find fellow travelers in places you didn’t think you would. 

Back to Chad

What is clear, however, is that the people who came to attack Chad Felix Green were not Republicans who were outraged by him daring to compare his Conservative-ness to being gay. It was the left-wing outrage brigade which sought to ridicule him for daring to say “hey, it was tougher for me to be accepted as a conservative than as a gay man.”

I’m sure that’s not the experience of everyone who “comes out” as gay, conservative, or both. However, that was his. Agree, disagree, or other. Think it doesn’t matter? That’s fine. Think he’s crazy? Okay. Think he’s just plain old wrong about this? Hey, that’s fine too.  

But don’t try to silence him or tell him to shut up for sharing his experience. You’re free to dismiss it. That’s your right. But if I know Chad (and I don’t), I don’t think you’ll have much luck getting him to shut up.

What’s also clear is that those who came to Chad Felix Green’s defense were not Liberal Democrats. They weren’t cut from the Progressive cloth. They were Conservatives, Republicans, and Libertarians. 

Draw whatever conclusions you like from that. Call it pandering to those evil gay-hating Republicans if you will. I happen to think Chad would call it progress. 

So would I.

the hateful left

I First Encountered The Hateful Left Nearly 20 Years Ago. It’s Worse Now

It’s hard to pinpoint when this deep, divisive animosity first washed over the country. The election of Donald Trump seems like the starting point to many. However, I can personally trace the beginnings of this back to my days in high school in the early 2000’s. That is when I first encountered the hateful left

This is admittedly anecdotal.

My Beginnings.

I grew up in New York in the 1980’s and 1990’s. My parents were Republicans and loved Ronald Reagan. Though I knew my parents were Republicans, neither of them were particularly outspoken. I knew they voted red and liked Reagan. That was about as much of a political “indoctrination” as I had growing up.

We never spoke about politics, policies, or programs at the dinner table. Politics just wasn’t a part of our daily life. I never heard my parents talk about it with their friends, and my friends and I certainly didn’t know or care enough when I was young. Flash-forward to high school, the year 2000, and the 2000 Presidential Election between George W. Bush and Al Gore. This is when I first encountered the hateful left.

The 2000 Election And The Hateful Left

I was not old enough to vote in the 2000 election but my high school was doing a mock election of sorts as part of a learning exercise in politics, elections, etc. Remember, I had no clue about politics. I had no idea who Al Gore or George W. Bush was. I didn’t know or care about their politics, views, or policies.

A classmate and I were talking about the upcoming mock election and he asked me who I was voting for. I said I was voting for Bush. Why? I dunno. He was the Republican candidate and my parents were Republicans. I didn’t care, so whatever. I should pull the lever for Bush. It’s a mock election at a high school in New York and I’m 17 years old. As a result, it’s not like it means anything, right?

The look on my classmate’s face, and I still remember it, is usually reserved for people who admit to torturing small animals.

“Ew, you’re a Republican?” He asked. “How could you be that?”

To repeat myself yet again, remember that I had no idea what a Republican was. To be 100% fair, I’m sure my classmate really didn’t either. We were 17 after all. However, he had been taught in some way, shape, or form; perhaps by his parents, that Republicans were bad. Not just wrong or misguided or a political opponent. But bad.

Imagine My Reaction

I was surprised. Shocked, maybe. The moment still sticks out in my mind almost 20 years later. I may have even felt ashamed. For some reason, I had “outed” myself as something that other people looked down on. Something bad. Something maybe even evil as far as they were concerned.

That was the first moment I felt hatred from “the left.” It’s anecdotal, sure. I have no idea what became of my classmate or what he considers himself to be today, politically speaking. Granted, he was not “the left” at 17 years old and every bit as uninformed as I was. But whomever put that attitude in his head sure was.

It continued into college.

College Days

My experience in college was not as crazy as you hear about today. But the hateful left was there as well. There are a few moments that stick out in my mind as examples of what could be considered “hatred” by “the left” in college. I’ll stick to one for now.

I had just started school. This would probably have been barely a year after the exchange in high school. My first year in college and one of my first classes. A representative from a local New York organization came to speak with one of our classes.

This organization is relatively well known in New York and I won’t mention them by name. Primarily, they work towards social and environmental reform in and around New York State. The individual speaking (they may have been a student but I’m not sure), was pitching the organization and trying to get volunteers to come get involved. After telling us about all the things they were working on, I was interested. I mean, why not get involved, right? Maybe I could do some good.

The speaker said at the end of her talk that if we were interested to come see her and sign up.

“Unless you’re a Republican,” she said. “If so, then f**k you and we don’t want’cha.”

And just about everyone, including the professor, laughed.

Nothing To See Here?

It wasn’t the foul language. I’d heard plenty by then. I didn’t grow up sheltered. As a teenager, I was as foul-mouthed as they come. Still am, sometimes. But it was all of it. This person had been invited or at least allowed to come and speak to a Freshman college class. She cursed half the country and said “we don’t want you in our group.” The professor, leader of the class and a representative of the school, laughed and went right along with it. The hateful left strikes again.

Therefore, the message was clear. Republicans were not welcome at my school. If it wasn’t clear from that moment, it became clearer in the months and years ahead. I experienced or witnessed similar moments. Nothing was violent or traumatizing, mind you. But it was there and it was accepted.

If I had any Republican classmates, they didn’t out themselves. Classroom discussions about any social, government, or economic issue had to be given a left-leaning curve to it otherwise you weren’t taken seriously. No one voiced opposition. That the left-leaning perspective was the correct one was a foregone conclusion. Of course this is the right view to have. Anything else would just be ridiculous, if not evil. I, like many others, put my head down, did my work, and didn’t get involved.

This ridicule, condemnation, hatred, or spiteful feelings about the opposition were only coming, as far as I could see, from one side. The left. Republicans were the punchline to jokes. George W. Bush was literally Hitler (yes, it was said back then too), and anyone who was even slightly “on the right” was basically not welcomed in with open arms.

No, It Did Not Start With Trump

People like to speak about Trump as the cause of all this. That’s far too convenient. President Trump will not be remembered for being a great Statesman or an eloquent speaker. His rhetoric is charged, no doubt. However, as others have pointed out, Trump is not the cause. Trump is the effect. He is not the disease, but the symptom. Trump is not the beginning, and he may not be the end either.

The election of Trump is a response by Republicans for years of being demonized by their opponents.

Think aborting a baby is bad? You’re a misogynist who hates women. Want to own a gun? You support school shootings and love dead teenagers. Think there’s problems with welfare and it needs to be reformed? You hate poor people, you monster. Do you dare think that maybe the government running healthcare is a bad idea? Wow, now you hate sick cancer patients and want them to die. This is the hateful left.

Bubbling For Years

Years of this, fueled by fiery political rhetoric from the hateful left, and propped up by a corrupt and biased media which is essentially the propaganda arm of the Democratic Party (except for Fox News which is the same thing, just in the opposite direction), has led to this.

First, Republicans sent the good ol’ boy establishment GOP guy from Texas and he was called an illiterate moron who was somehow also literally Hitler and evil.

Then, Republicans sent the war hero whom the left has only recently decided they like again now that he’s deceased. He too was literally Hitler and according to Democrats and the media, probably senile and going to die in office. Then along came Mitt Romney. Perhaps the most morally decent person to seek the Presidency in the last several years. He too, was maligned as a rich misogynist with “binders full of women” who was going to bring back slavery.

Finally, Republicans said f**k it. This country is a china shop and we’re sending in the bull.

By The Way, I’m Not Even A Republican

I never felt like I was “raised to be a Republican.” It wasn’t a core part of my childhood. I certainly was not raised to hate my political opponents. Nor was I raised to think they were bad people. Certainly not evil.

I’m not even a Republican. When I turned 18 I registered to vote. My registration says “Independent.” It did then and it does now. Perhaps in part due to my upbringing I tend to side more with “the right” on issues, but I’m not a Republican and never have been.

So no, I’m not even a Republican. But based on my experienced with the hateful left as well as the behavior of the Democratic Party, I’m sure as hell not that either. I didn’t #walkaway from the Democratic Party. They never wanted me there to begin with.

Kavanaugh

Coping With Kavanaugh, AKA What Happens Next?

After a heated debate, it looks as though Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the Supreme Court this weekend with a vote of 51-49 or possibly 50-50. If the latter is the case, Vice President Mike Pence will cast the tie-breaking vote. Should that come to pass, it’s not exactly a secret what the VP will decide.

After an intense, heated, vitriolic ordeal; the end is near. For half the country, the impending appointment will come as a sigh of relief. For the other half, however…. well, it remains to be seen how they’ll react once the vote becomes final.

All that leads to the question of what happens next? Where do we go from here? On that note, a few thoughts.

Your Life Is Not Over

The Supreme Court is not supposed to have this much power or control over our lives. Even if it seems as though it does, it really doesn’t even in modern times. The primary function of the Supreme Court is not to legislate. It is to serve as a Constitutional check on power for the Legislative (and Executive) branch of government.

Ask 10 random people in your life what their favorite Supreme Court decision was and Roe V. Wade doesn’t count. Odds are, you’ll get 10 blank stares. The reason? The average person is barely aware that the United States has a Supreme Court, let alone who’s on it, what cases it hears, and what decisions are made.

Beyond that, try asking 10 people which Supreme Court decision has had the most positive or negative impact on their life. Again, Roe V. Wade doesn’t count. 10 more blank stares. Mind you, it’s not that Roe V. Wade isn’t/wasn’t a landmark Supreme Court case. It was. However, beyond that extremely well-known case, most people (myself included) simply don’t pay attention.

The Supreme Court does have power. Their decisions do impact our lives. However, for the average American on an average day? The Supreme Court isn’t really on their mind.

Kavanaugh Isn’t Who You Think He Is

There are a few things that Brett Kavanaugh is; and a few things he isn’t. There are also a few things he might be. If you’re inclined to believe he’s a crazy, alcoholic, rapist: well, probably nothing will convince you otherwise. A well-respected judge? Prior to his nomination, yes. An Originalist? Yes. Right-wing? Sure. Is he on the level of a Clarence Thomas? Yes.

There’s no way of getting around the fact that Brett Kavanaugh is a conservative Republican, picked by conservative Republicans, and vetted by conservative Republican groups. That said, he’s not the Nazi extremist many are making him out to be.

Does he favor overturning Roe V. Wade? Probably yes, as most conservatives do. Would he? Probably not. The Supreme Court does not get to decide to revisit an old issue just for the hell of it. A law of some kind would have to be created, then challenged, then work its way up the system to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court would have to decide to hear the case. Then, they would have to decide to rule on it one way or another.

That’s a lot of “ifs.” It isn’t outside the realm of possibility, but it certainly isn’t imminent. Nor is it clear that the likes of Kavanaugh and Gorsuch would vote in such a way. The thing about Originalists is that they’re very “letter of the law” when it comes to their decisions. This means that the law has to be soundly written and applied, leaving little room for interpretation.

This stands in stark contrast with activist judges (on both sides) who seek to cram square pegs into round holes; making a law fit no matter what.

In any case, should an “overturn” of Roe V. Wade occur, the issue would simply go to the states where they can decide whether or not to keep it. In my opinion, there’s nothing wrong with this approach. Let the governors and state legislators decide what is best for their direct constituents; to whom they are most accountable.

The End Is Nowhere Near

There may yet come a challenge to Roe V. Wade in the future. However, the notion that Kavanaugh will spend his first day on the court taking a red pen to the decision is factually incorrect and absurd on its face. It’s as absurd as the notion that this “right-wing takeover” of the Supreme Court will turn women into property, enslave all minorities, and disband democracy.

The frenzy that those on the left have worked themselves into is as dishonest as it is counterproductive to their goals. Have you noticed how the “Trump is a Nazi” rhetoric has died down? Part of that is organic and part of that is planned.

When most of the President’s family is Jewish, (or married into Judaism), is BFF’s with Israel, deports an actual Nazi, and moves the US embassy to Jerusalem; it’s kind of hard to keep up that sort of rhetoric. The “Literally Hitler” crowd has quieted and it’s partially because there’s no traction to be had with such an argument.

Of course, the extreme left still thinks Donald Trump is literally Hitler. The same way the extreme right thinks Obama is literally a foreign-born terrorist. Both are silly and counterproductive. All it takes is for Donald Trump to, you know, not be Hitler; or for Obama to, you know, not do terroristy things.

A Low Bar

When the bar is set that low, the enthusiasm for any conspiracy theory fizzles. Most importantly, moderates who may otherwise share your views tend to drop off as well. They say “okay, well, this guy isn’t really Hitler…. so what the hell are they talking about?”

I know, because I’ve gone down the “Hillary Clinton is a satanic priestess who eats babies” internet rabbit hole in the past. There’s not a lot of substance to be had there. Sometimes these things gain traction briefly. When they don’t add up, you’re left looking ridiculous.

The bar is being similarly set low for Kavanaugh. All he truly needs to do to quiet the extreme rhetoric is, you know, not declare that all women are baby factories who are owned by men. He’ll no doubt receive more attention than most Supreme Court justices (save for the Democrat’s love affair with the Notorious RBG), but that too will fizzle. He’ll vote on the same ho-hum issues that most Americans don’t care about and we’ll soon forget all about how he was going to declare that all women were now property with no legal rights.

The good thing is that even if Kavanaugh wanted to decree such a thing (I’m fairly certain he does not), it would mean nothing and he’d be decreeing it to no one. Why? Because the Supreme Court doesn’t decree anything. It cannot, and does not go off on a legislative tangent just for the hell of it.

If the country really believed we’d elected “literally Hitler” in 2016, there would be far more resistance to him than the so-called #resistance. Democrats in Congress talk a good game but mostly give Trump what he wants. They vote for his budgets, his spending, and to expand the powers of the Executive branch with regularity.

The #resistance exists on Twitter. It doesn’t really exist in Congress.

So, What Happens Next?

Susan CollinsWhat happens next is anyone’s guess. How will the extreme left react this weekend? We’ll see. I have a feeling it will be neither pretty nor quiet. The behavior of Senate Democrats as well as leftist protesters during this ordeal has been nothing short of laughable at best, and reprehensible at worst.

Apparently sending Susan Collins coat hangers in the mail as a cruel nod to abortion didn’t have the desired effect. Or doxxing Senate Republicans. Or screaming about white male patriarchy because that always works. Yes, truly this is the work of sane, well-balanced people and not, you know, crazy.

Mind you, I don’t begrudge anyone their right to protest. I just wish their protests were more grounded in reality as opposed to regurgitating hypocritical pseudoscience pop culture psychobabble buzzwords. I mean, it’s just sort of silly, that’s all.

But it is amusing and the memes are good so, you know, silver lining there.

The right to protest is enshrined in the Constitution. So, whatever they do; Leftist activists should take solace in the fact that having Originalists on the court means that right isn’t going anywhere.

I just hope the irony isn’t lost on them.

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