Here’s the thing about NFL kneeling. I grew up in Colorado and was a die-hard Broncos fan.

I BLED BLUE AND ORANGE. Sundays were my Do Not Disturb, I’m watching football day.

We were the sworn enemy of the Oakland Raiders and wore our NFL gear with pride.

When this whole NFL kneeling controversy started with Colin Kaepernick, I didn’t pay much attention because he wasn’t on my team.

In my mind, he was a horrible quarterback and was convinced this was just a way to distract people from the real issue with him: He’s a terrible player

His pity party carried on after the 2016 season when he was cut from the 49ers.  Surprised?  I wasn’t.  Look at this stats.  Of course in his mind, this wasn’t the case.  Like most spoiled, entitled brats, they are incapable of taking any kind of responsibility for themselves.

The fact that he hadn’t been fined the first time he did it was shocking to me.

The NFL was more than happy to fine Brian Urlacher for wearing an unlicensed hat for Vitamin Water during a press conference.

Or Sean Taylor of the Pittsburgh Steelers for writing “21” on his eye black to commemorate the memory of a fallen friend. Or even fining Frank Gore of the 49ers because his socks were too low. Not joking.

They weren’t afraid to fine Kaepernick for wearing these pink Beats headphones for Breast Cancer Awareness.

So why the change in policy all of sudden?

Had the NFL maintained some level of consistency with their policies and fine him the first time, they may have been able to avoid this whole mess in the first place.

And yet, here we are barreling toward round 2 of this divisive nonsense.  And yes, I believe that it’s nonsense.

Here’s Why

For starters, many other conservative personalities have already emphasized the BLATANT hypocrisy of this protest by pointing out that the majority of black men in this country who are murdered are actually killed by other black men. Not police officers. Not to mention, the NFL creates more victims of violence than it actually prevents considering their players are arrested for domestic violence more than any other professional sport.

Now I’m not saying that racism is completely dead in this country and I’m also not saying that it isn’t important to bring these issues out into the light where people can discuss them, find solutions and work towards solving an actual problem.

I support activism, freedom of speech and am always happy to see people in positions of influence us their status for good.

Like going out into a community and helping to build youth centers or feed the homeless.

Kneeling for the National Anthem isn’t activism.  It’s just plain lazy.

It takes zero effort, money or time to kneel down during our nation’s greatest song.  As soon as it’s over, the players stand up, play the game, collect their millions of dollars and drive home in whatever fancy car they have.

Activism and community service are no longer a concern to them as they pull up to their multimillion-dollar homes.  They won’t be concerned with any more “community service” until next Sunday.

(To be fair, I’m sure there are at least a few kneeling players who devote some time to their communities.  For the most part, though, the players we see as being really involved in their communities are the ones standing.)

Anyone can exploit some easy media coverage. It takes a real hero to go out into the community and do some actual work.

The second and arguably more important factor to consider is, they are exploiting their place of employment.

Source:ESPN

If I was hired by a business and I chose to use it as a platform to make political statements, anger 50% of my customers and cost them millions of dollars in revenue, what do you think would happen? I would get fired.  Yep, I would definitely get fired and so would you.

This is what it all really boils down to.

These players are employees (contracted or otherwise) and if their behavior is detrimental to the company, they should get fired.  These protests are angering a huge portion of their customer base, their advertisers, and sponsors.  The NFL needs to stop kowtowing around this issue and do what they should have done in the first place. Run the NFL like the business that it is.

Establish a set of rules and then actually stick to them.

If you don’t like them, go get a regular job and see how they feel about your protest then.

Pretty sure there are hundreds of young athletes praying every single night for an opportunity that these players have. And I would be willing to bet money that they would go out there, play their butts off and be grateful they can live in a country where they get paid millions of dollars to play a sport.

I was hoping I could simply go back to cheering for my home team this season. However, it appears the NFL will continue to be bullied and pushed around by its own players and their identity politics.

To that, I say, hockey anyone?

GOOOOOOO KNIGHTS!